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FemmeSnaz

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(no subject) [Oct. 21st, 2005|12:05 pm]
FemmeSnaz
msamehe
Anyone here have any comments on the book Female Chauvinist Pigs by Ariel Levy?
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I'm ashamed to have some of the same genetic makeup as him.. [Jun. 19th, 2005|10:22 am]
FemmeSnaz

belly___dancer
I'm not sure if this is quite the right place to put this inquiry/rant, but I needed some insight from women who will most likely see my point of view. This journal was created to place this entry here, as family members read my other one. I've voiced my distaste for this relative to friends and family only to be met with shrugged shoulders and a "Well he's family, you have to deal with him."

So my uncle's a misogynist...

Is it wrong to avoid him like the plague?Collapse )

Those were only a few examples so it's not really painting a true picture of him but you can get some idea.

I'm not overly senstive by any means but it makes me almost physically ill to be around him. He lives clear across the country so thankfully I don't have to have much contact with him, but my dad loves to attempt to force me to spend time with him. "He's family, I know he's a bit of a redneck, but you HAVE to be around him."

Is it wrong to feel this way? Seriously, if I never saw him again for the rest of my life I would be perfectly happy.
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(no subject) [Jan. 25th, 2005|09:49 pm]
FemmeSnaz

___nazicar
Hello. My name is Greta & I just joined. I joined because I am into feminism & learning more about the different types.
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Intro... [Aug. 19th, 2004|01:27 pm]
FemmeSnaz

i_am_ruined
I've been a member of this community for quite a while & haven't really introduced myself, so here goes my attempt to do so. My name's Greta. i_am_ruined Tells ALMOST everything about me. If your still interested about me, AIM me: mysacredheart66 or go to my 'myspace' profile it tells EVERYTHING: http://profiles.myspace.com/users/4334237 Oh and this might or not be related to the community, but this is my 'riot grrrl online' site: http://riotgrrrl.girlsvomitcandy.com/ I have 7 other sites as well & more journals, check out my user info for more info. Anyhow, I'm glad to be a member of this community...this community is awesome!
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Feminist Writing Selections--Ideas? [Jun. 13th, 2004|02:08 am]
FemmeSnaz

humynbeing
My high school starts each year with a week of "Writing and Thinking Workshop" where we are given a book of various short writing selections (all sorts of stuff--fiction, nonfiction, poetry, prose...) which we read, write about, and discuss.

Female writers have usually been underrepresented in these books, but this year the feminist club at my school has the opportunity to choose a few selections. I'm really excited about the opportunity to help change the often negative reactions people have to "feminism"--both the word and the concept.

So I was wondering if anybody here could suggest some pieces. We'd especially like to have some from first wave feminists, or by men, or that talk about the value and meaning of the word feminism.

But we're open to anything. So if there's any piece of feminist writing (any type) that you really like, please let me know!
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Hm. [May. 26th, 2004|11:38 pm]
FemmeSnaz

aquatang
[mood |curiouscurious]

Maybe it's just me, but I haven't seen any new posts in this community for a bit? [or they're just being crowded out by my other friends..?]

my friend asked me the other day why I call myself a feminist. "I mean.. aren't there a lot of bad things that go with it? Why not just say I'm for equal rights? That's what I say." And I thought about a little, and how last year I was a little hesitant to call myself a feminist - not because of the bra burning, or whatever other myths are associated with being a feminist.. but instead, that I was afraid to be a feminist and accidentally say something that might not represent everyone's views [everyone being all those in the movement, or who consider themselves feminists]. And another friend brought up the issue of "what about guys? They can't call themselves.. feminists! I mean.. it has the word.. FEMININE built into it!" To which I replied, "there was a judge at the Wake Forest Tournament [for debate] who proudly called himself a feminist. Being a feminist does not mean you have to be a femme[woman]."

Well. I guess that whole anecdote was rather pointless. So I was just wondering, and maybe this is much too common a question.. but what do you think of / see / imagine when you hear the word "feminism"?
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Gendered Marketing Strategies [Apr. 30th, 2004|07:52 pm]
FemmeSnaz

humynbeing
I thought I'd explore the differences in the websites of products marketed mainly to males (I chose condoms) and products marketed to females (I chose tampons). I wanted to choose a female contraceptive device, but there weren't any that were strongly branded the way condoms and tampons are.

I went to the Trojan and Durex websites, as well as the Kotex and Tampax websites. I found that both condom websites were similarly structured--they had a no-nonsense sort of layout--with information, downloads, and even games. There were few graphics.

The tampon websites both greeted me with huge photodisplays of smiling women from what appeared to be diverse backgrounds. The websites appeared to be created to be pretty and comfortable-looking, and seemed to have a conversational tone. For instance, where a condom website would have a link that said, "Info Center", the tampon website would have something like, "Info, please!"

Tampax said, "Would you like your next period to be more comfortable? Find out how!" This link to you to it's tampon selector. Trojan, on the other hand, just had a link saying, "Trojan Selector".

Kate Bornstein, a male-to-female transsexual says that before her transition when working in sales, customers would want to hear her "expert opinion". But when she presented herself as female, they no longer wanted any facts or opinions from her when deciding on a product.

I get this impression with these websites. The condom websites are upfront informational, while the tampon websites adopt a friendly tone. To me, this feels condescending and sexist and seems like an example of creating a certain role for women to fulfil to keep us down.

What do you think? Is this difference in marketing strategy significant? Does it reflect social roles or mirror them or is it irrelevant?

Here are the websites I checked:
Tampax
Kotex
Trojan
Durex
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(no subject) [Apr. 23rd, 2004|09:31 pm]
FemmeSnaz

untergehen
The following article first appeared in the Australian computer magazine atOmic MPC. I found it an interesting take on the geek subculture and it's sexist overtones. Read on.


The e-sports community recently applauded a decision made by the Cyberathlete Professional League not to hold a female Counter-Strike league. CPL frontman Angel Munoz decided against the move citing the equal worth of male and female competitors. It's no secret that e-sports, and gaming in general, has been moving slowly toward the female market.

Five years ago, female gamers were a rare thing; a party trick. One of the 'cool nerds' dragged them along to a LAN and proclaimed "hey! my girlfriend plays games!". She, meanwhile, would sit silently in the corner behind a dusty fifteen inch monitor playing her twentieth game of hearts.

Come forward a few years, and the LAN-female is not such a rare sight. Literally hundreds of all-female clans exist across the whole board of games from Warcraft to Quake III. It seems like game companies have finally cracked the hardest nut of all.

So why, more than ever, are we finding blatant sexism in games? Surely an increased female audience could press developers into widening the waistlines and re-proportioning the bust-to-body ratio of female characters. The man himself, Paul Steed, creator of models for games such as Quake III says it's merely a case of demand and supply. To any discerning gamer this sounds a lot like we're being told sexism is the norm and we should just go with it. We've no doubt the almighty dollar is a strong force in the production of games, but is profit being placed ahead of the gaming community's dignity? Let's explain.

Age old stereotypes abound in the community concerning the quintessential 'geek'. Loner with no friends sitting at home all day playing games and searching for the latest Tomb Raider screenshots to drool over. Over the past two or three years we've seen a change in people's perception of LANers with one key exception; busty women are still the focus of the quintessential geek's life. Has sexism become inherent to the LAN subculture?

There can be no doubt that e-sports could offer the world the perfect competition. The online world is a haven of anonymity and equality. As the famous hacker 'The Mentor' put it when speaking on the subject of cyber-anonymity "We exist without skin color, without nationality, without religious bias", and this is just as true today. Sure, there are international rivalries between countries, but these are friendly rivalries that spur players to attain a level of perfection not seen in recent years. Yet this anonymity is generally not afforded to the female populace unless they are smurfing under a male name. Admitting you're female is asking for twenty private messages and various requests for cybersex.
Who says female gamers don't deserve the same level of respect as male gamers? Actually, many believe that women are more predisposed to multi-tasking than men. Theoretically, this means women would be better at map control, strat planning and micro-management. The top-gamers of tommorow could all be female. It's a growing trend, too. Clans like BadGirlsClan, the largest all-female clan in the world are popping up everywhere, matching some of the toughest competition in the world. Pro-gamer mad Korea has huge numbers of female Starcraft players, some of whom, ToSSgirl for example, are celebrities in their own right. So what it comes down to is a simple idea of equality. Let's all get off our arses and stop calling fill-in players 'sluts' and using obtuse sexual innuendo whenever girls are mentioned in gaming media. Who knows, one day a female could be your WCG champion.

For discussion:Which subcultures do you identify as being stereotypically sexist?
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radio & TV ads [Apr. 18th, 2004|11:19 am]
FemmeSnaz

aquatang
[mood |frustratedfrustrated]

Heard an ad on the radio on the way home from badminton for the LOC - Library of Congress. It went something like this:

guy - hey girls! did you know that Thomas Jefferson invented macaroni?? [or macaroni machine. not sure]
girls - wow! where'd you learn THAT?
guy - loc.gov!
girls - wow.. he's so buff! Such a HISTORY buff ever since he started checking out
www.loc.gov! SWOOOON!

That made me sick. I'm not sure what the LoC was trying to accomplish aside from saying go to our website, but using the lure of "oh look, you can get GIRLS if you go to this site!" is just disgusting and repugnant. I heard it on KCBS 740 radio station [sf]

There's another ad that's been running on TV. I think it's Crest Whitestrips? The ones where there are girls sitting and chatting, and another one comes in all smiles. The rest react to her happiness with a: oh god, who is it THIS time? and she denies it being a guy. Some of the ads have the others saying things about how she has no commitment to diets or trivial things like that. I have issues with the reaction to her happiness - why does it HAVE to be a guy? Can't she just be happy because she got a promotion? Finished a project on time? Found a great organization? Got a good review from her boss? And the other stuff annoys me because it's so trivial. Though I guess whitening your teeth is pretty trivial anyway..

I guess that was very nonsensical, heh. Sorry..

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Men, Women and Pornography. [Apr. 18th, 2004|07:45 pm]
FemmeSnaz

this_marionette
I have noticed that in the consideration of porn actors, most people seem to portray only women as victims.

For Debate/Discussion: Is this just sexism, or are women more vulnerable because of the media's sexism?

My Stance: Yes, this is sexism.
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